Fire Danger High

Fire Danger High

The high temperatures and dry conditions have increased the Fire Danger Rating back to High, please use extreme caution to prevent any ignition sources!
High: Forest fuels are very dry and the risk is serious. New fires may start easily, burn vigorously, and challenge fire suppression efforts. Extreme caution must be used in any forest activities.
Campfires measuring 0.5m x 0.5m are still permitted at this time provided you have a source of water on hand to extinguish the fire quickly.
Thanks for your cooperation and stay safe!

Fire Restrictions

Due to hot and dry conditions in the Barriere Fire District, only campfires that meet the BC Open Fire Regulations will be permitted until further notice.
We want everyone to have a safe and happy long weekend!
BC Open Fire Regulations

Campfire Ban Lifted

Effective at noon on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, campfires will once again be allowed throughout the Kamloops Fire Centre, Southeast Fire Centre and Cariboo Fire Centre. A return to more seasonal weather conditions and recent precipitation has reduced the wildfire risk in these areas.

The BC Wildfire Service reminds the public that Category 2 and Category 3 open fires, which are fires larger than 0.5 metres by 0.5 metres, remain prohibited in these three fire centres.

 

 

Fire Ban Continues

As we enter the September long weekend the Barriere Fire Department would like to remind you a TOTAL Fire Ban is still in effect.

With almost no precipitation over several months and hot and dry conditions forecast into the future we are still experiencing an EXTREME Fire Danger Rating.

Anyone in violation of the ban will face a $300 bylaw ticket for contravening Bylaw 55. You could also face a violation ticket of up to $1150 from BCWildfire.

We THANK YOU for your patience and continued support during this ban.

 

TOTAL FIRE BAN

 

Effective July 01 2017 A FULL FIRE BAN will be in effect until further notice within the Barriere and Area Fire District.

As the area has now reached a High fire danger with pockets of Extreme the Fire Chief is enforcing a full fire ban until weather permits.

Residents outside the fire district are encouraged to check with BC Wildfire on all current restrictions.

Residents inside the fire district can find up-to-date information regarding restrictions at barrierefire.com, Barriere Fire Department Facebook page, and the barriere.ca

Thank you for your patience as we enter the summer time heat!

Fire Chief

Drew McMartin

Flooding And Sand Bags

We have received our first call for sand bags due to flooding. If you need SAND BAGS please contact Ashley @ 250-318-9711.

She will direct you on how to get them.

We have all services on standby and ready to react if we have any flooding issues.

Please contact us immediately if you need assistance.

If its an emergency contact 911.

 

Fire Prevention Week 2016!

Fire Prevention Week

 fpw_2016

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Don’t Wait – Check the Date! Replace Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years,” represents the final year of our three-year effort to educate the public about basic but essential elements of smoke alarm safety.

Why focus on smoke alarms three years in a row? Because NFPA’s survey data shows that the public has many misconceptions about smoke alarms, which may put them at increased risk in the event of a home fire. For example, only a small percentage of people know how old their smoke alarms are, or how often they need to be replaced. Read more from NFPA Journal.

As a result of those and related findings, we’re addressing smoke alarm replacement this year with a focus on these key messages:

  • Smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years.
  • Make sure you know how old all the smoke alarms are in your home.
  • To find out how old a smoke alarm is, look at the date of manufacture on the back of the alarm; the alarm should be replaced 10 years from that date.

Backyard Burning Tips

Backyard1

Tips for Safe Debris Burning

  • Comply with Local Regulations:
    Contact your local fire department in advance to confirm that burning is allowed and to find out whether a permit is required to burn debris.
  • Check the Weather Forecast
    Weather fluctuations, such as sudden gusts of wind, could make debris burning spark a wildfire. Call your local fire department the day you plan to burn debris to finalize that the weather is safe enough to burn.
  • Choose a Safe Burning Site
    A safe site will be far away from power lines, overhanging limbs, buildings, automobiles, and equipment. It will have vertical clearance at least three times the height of the pile, as heat from the fire extends far past the actual flames that you see.It will have horizontal clearance twice the height of the debris pile.
  • Prepare the Site Correctly:
    The ground around the burn site should be surrounded by gravel or mineral soil (dirt) for at least ten feet in all directions. Keep the surrounding area watered down during the burn.
  • If using a Burn Barrel, Make Sure it is Equipped with the Proper Features
    Burn Barrels must be made of all-metal construction in good condition (no rust on the sides or bottom) and properly ventilated with three evenly-spaced, three-inch square vents spaced evenly around the rim near ground level. Each vent must be backed by a metal screen. A Burn Barrel must have a metal top screen with mesh size of one-fourth inch or finer to keep sparks from escaping and potentially sparking a wildfire. When burning, layer the different types of debris and stir often. Be careful of sparks escaping the barrel when you stir it.
  • Remain With your Fire
    Stay with your fire until it is completely out. To ensure the fire has been completely extinguished, drown the fire with water, turn over the ashes with a shovel and drown it again. Repeat several times. Check the burn area regularly over the next several days and up to several weeks following the burn, especially if the weather is warm, dry, and windy.
  • Keep it Legal
    It is illegal to burn plastic, tires, and most other waste products not from a tree or shrub.

First Responder Level 3 Training

FRtraining-page-001